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Old 09-09-2011, 12:54 AM
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Default Feeding Monitors raw eggs??????

I don't know if this has already been discussed here but better to be safe than sorry as it is of great importance, and as I had cause to hunt it out among my files here, it is now posted below.

Mo. :)

The other B complex vitamins are synthesized by the bacteria and protozoa within the intestinal tract of normal reptiles. Raw egg whites contain avidin, which prevents biotin from being processed within the animal. A deficiency may occur in feeding egg-eating reptiles a diet of exclusively whole raw eggs. Egg-eating reptiles in nature rarely acquire a biotin deficiency because most eggs eaten are fertile and embryonic tissue contains biotin. Occasionally, especially following any antimicrobial therapy, the normal flora will die off, allowing a deficiency to occur. By using vitamin B complex supplementation as well as intestinal culture inoculation, the situation is easily correctable.

The above comes from Animal Veterinary Hospital of Orlando
(407) 855-PETS (407) 855-7387
1320 Oak Ridge Road, Orlando, Fl. 32809
Written by Dr. Bruce Bogoslavsky



A Matter of Eggs as Monitor fare by Mark D. Butler, D.V.M. Animal Care Unlimited, 2665 Billingsley Rd. Columbus, Ohio 43235

We all know that good husbandry is vital to a healthy pet. This is especially true of reptiles, including varanids. Proper nutrition is a big part of proper husbandry. Most varanids as carnivores are fed whole prey items and as such seem to suffer few nutritional deficiencies. There is one notable exception.

A number of monitors in captivity are fed whole raw hen's eggs almost exclusively, and a biotin deficiency can be seen. The problem is not so much that the diet is deficient in biotin. Biotin is found in almost all food items. Futhermore, the intestinal microflora produces the water soluble B-complex vitamins, including biotin, which are then absorbed from the fecal material as it goes through the last part of the intestine. The problem is that raw avian egg white contains avidin, which has anti-biotin biologic activity. The avidin neutralizes biotin in the intestinal tract before it is absorbed.

In nature, egg-eating (oviphagous) species usually eat fertilized eggs. The difference is that the embryonic tissue present in developing eggs contains biotin. Futhermore, some of the avidin in embryonated eggs is used up as development progresses. Finally, most oviphagous species often will feed on small mammals and birds as well as fertilized eggs. These food items are an additional source of biotin.

A biotin deficiency can cause muscle tremors and generalized muscle weakness. Treatment includes B-complex supplementation and correction of the diet, remembering that the problem is feeding whole raw, unfertilized eggs almost exclusively.
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Old 10-09-2011, 10:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maureen C. View Post
I don't know if this has already been discussed here but better to be safe than sorry as it is of great importance, and as I had cause to hunt it out among my files here, it is now posted below.

Mo. :)

The other B complex vitamins are synthesized by the bacteria and protozoa within the intestinal tract of normal reptiles. Raw egg whites contain avidin, which prevents biotin from being processed within the animal. A deficiency may occur in feeding egg-eating reptiles a diet of exclusively whole raw eggs. Egg-eating reptiles in nature rarely acquire a biotin deficiency because most eggs eaten are fertile and embryonic tissue contains biotin. Occasionally, especially following any antimicrobial therapy, the normal flora will die off, allowing a deficiency to occur. By using vitamin B complex supplementation as well as intestinal culture inoculation, the situation is easily correctable.

The above comes from Animal Veterinary Hospital of Orlando
(407) 855-PETS (407) 855-7387
1320 Oak Ridge Road, Orlando, Fl. 32809
Written by Dr. Bruce Bogoslavsky



A Matter of Eggs as Monitor fare by Mark D. Butler, D.V.M. Animal Care Unlimited, 2665 Billingsley Rd. Columbus, Ohio 43235

We all know that good husbandry is vital to a healthy pet. This is especially true of reptiles, including varanids. Proper nutrition is a big part of proper husbandry. Most varanids as carnivores are fed whole prey items and as such seem to suffer few nutritional deficiencies. There is one notable exception.

A number of monitors in captivity are fed whole raw hen's eggs almost exclusively, and a biotin deficiency can be seen. The problem is not so much that the diet is deficient in biotin. Biotin is found in almost all food items. Futhermore, the intestinal microflora produces the water soluble B-complex vitamins, including biotin, which are then absorbed from the fecal material as it goes through the last part of the intestine. The problem is that raw avian egg white contains avidin, which has anti-biotin biologic activity. The avidin neutralizes biotin in the intestinal tract before it is absorbed.

In nature, egg-eating (oviphagous) species usually eat fertilized eggs. The difference is that the embryonic tissue present in developing eggs contains biotin. Futhermore, some of the avidin in embryonated eggs is used up as development progresses. Finally, most oviphagous species often will feed on small mammals and birds as well as fertilized eggs. These food items are an additional source of biotin.

A biotin deficiency can cause muscle tremors and generalized muscle weakness. Treatment includes B-complex supplementation and correction of the diet, remembering that the problem is feeding whole raw, unfertilized eggs almost exclusively.
no harm in posting useful information:) main thing is feed once in a while & cook them or feed fertilised eggs ( ain't a clue where you buy them from though!).
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Old 10-09-2011, 07:37 PM
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Hi Mark,
I buy fertilised quail eggs on ebay (just type that in), they`d be the perfect size for your young niloticus just now!
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:00 PM
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Hi Mark,
I buy fertilised quail eggs on ebay (just type that in), they`d be the perfect size for your young niloticus just now!
thank you!
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Old 13-09-2011, 09:53 AM
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Interesting ! Thanks

Did not know that you can get eggs through ebay .. if they make it in one pice that is..
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